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Recipients of the 

1988 Presidential Awards 

for Design Excellence 






Kjood design . . . 

should not be viewed as a luxury 

added on at extra cost but as 

a process for increasing the efficiency 

and quality of our lives. Our ability to 

compete effectively in international 

markets depends largely on an often 

overlooked, but integral element — 

design quality. 

RONALD REAGAN 



On Announcing the 
1988 Presidential Design Awards 




mk 



Foreword 

The ten award-winning proj- 
ects of the second Presiden- 
tial Design Awards establish a 
tradition of excellence set by the 
first thirteen winners. In present- 
ing the first Presidential Awards 
for Design Excellence on January 
30, 1985, President Reagan said 
that these "... awards prove that 
inspired design, the genius that 
makes ordinary things work well 
and look beautiful, is possible 
from within the federal ranks." 

Indeed, it is possible when ded- 
icated designers combine their en- 
ergy and talent with sympathetic 
and able administrators. The 
awards are the visible results of 
that collaborative process. These 
results benefit all citizens and de- 
monstrate the successful design 
leadership of the Federal 
government. 

Five criteria guided entrants 
and the juries. A project had to 1) 
contribute to the Federal govern- 
ment's mission; 2) establish 
model design practices, standards, 
or guidelines; 3) demonstrate 
careful design planning and cost 
effectiveness without sacrificing 
performance or quality; 4) ex- 
emplify aesthetic merit; 5) dem- 
onstrate significant technical and 
functional performance. 



The awards were established by 
President Reagan in 1983 to 
honor and to encourage exem- 
plary achievements for design 
projects and programs that have 
been authorized, commissioned, 
produced, supported, or promul- 
gated by the Federal government. 
The awards are given every four 
years and are administered by the 
National Endowment for the Arts 
as part of its ongoing Federal De- 
sign Improvement Program. 

The Federal Design Improve- 
ment Program represents a legacy 
of Presidential concern for design 
quality dating back to George 
Washington. From Washington's 
intense personal interest in the 
design of the nation's capital to 
President Reagan's establishment 
of the Presidential Awards for De- 
sign Excellence in 1983, concern 
for design quality has been ex- 
hibited continuously at the high- 
est level of government. 

The National Endowment for 
the Arts is a proud participant in 
the effort to foster and recognize 
those individuals responsible for 
fulfilling the public trust through 
design excellence. 



Frank Hodsoll 

Chairman 

National Endowment for the Arts 




Introduction 

Kings Mountain, NC; Hepp- 
ner, OR; Boston, MA; Tex- 
arkana, TX; Santa Monica, CA; 
Reston, VA; Buffalo National 
River, AR; Chicago, IL; Tampa, 
FL; Lackawaxen, PA; Nashville, 
TN — these are the locations of 
some of the projects that have 
won 1988 Presidential Design 
Awards. They are examples of fed- 
eral design that touch the life and 
landscape of America, and 
beyond our borders. 

The winners listed in this bro- 
chure are a visible tribute to what 
we are as a nation, and what we 
hold valuable. They are manifes- 
tations of our dreams and aspira- 
tions as a country. They show a 
striving for quality in housing, 
transportation, communications, 
urban revitalization, and rural 
preservation. They show a respect 
for nature, a concern for safety, a 
passion for understanding the 
universe, a commitment to public 
service, a reverence for the past, 
and a desire to foster the creative 
genius of the human mind. 

The Presidential Design Awards 
jury represents the best, too — the 
best of the nation's designers. The 
awards were selected through a 
two-stage process. The first stage 
jury was comprised of four design 
discipline subjuries: architecture 



and interior design, chaired by 
Henry N. Cobb; engineering de- 
sign, chaired by Mario Salvadori; 
graphics and product design, 
chaired by Leila Vignelli; and 
landscape architecture, urban de- 
sign, and planning, chaired by 
Joan Goody. This jury reviewed 
more than 500 entries from 64 
federal departments and agencies 
and selected 68 to receive Federal 
Design Achievement Awards, the 
Arts Endowment's own highest 
award for design. 

The projects and programs 
awarded Federal Design Achieve- 
ment Awards became eligible for 
a Presidential Award for Design 
Excellence. A second jury, chaired 
by Frank Stanton, recommended 
10 of the 68 projects receive this 
award. 

Design is everywhere, and the 
Federal government is a major 
player in American design. The 
Design Arts Program, through its 
Federal Design Improvement Pro- 
gram, is committed to helping 
federal agencies achieve the high- 
est standards of design, thereby 
making the Federal government a 
leader in design quality. 

Adele Chatfield-Taylor 

Director 

Design Arts Program 




L to R Standing: Daniel 
Kiley • Florence Knoll 
Bassett • Donald Stull • Lois 
Craig • Niels Diffrient • Barbara 
Stauffacher Solomon • Claire 
Bogaard • Peter Masters • L to R 
Seated: Henry N. Cobb • Leila 
Vignelli • Frank Stanton, Chair • 
Joan Goody • Mario Salvadori 



Report of the Presidential Jury 

Design affects every aspect of 
our daily lives — physically, 
economically, politically, and psy- 
chologically You can not talk 
about the quality of life without 
talking about the quality of de- 
sign. You can not have one with- 
out the other. 

Since the purpose of govern- 
ment is to help each citizen 
achieve the highest quality of life, 
it has an obligation to foster good 
design. Building on a 200-year 
history of presidential interest in 
design, President Reagan estab- 
lished the Presidential Design 
Awards to encourage design ex- 
cellence throughout the Federal 
government and to honor 
achievements in federal design. 

The 1988 Presidential Design 
Awards jury is pleased to recom- 
mend 68 projects, from more than 
500 submissions, to receive Fed- 
eral Design Achievement Awards. 
Ten of these projects are recom- 
mended for the Presidential 
Awards for Design Excellence. 
These selections illustrate the 



breadth of federal design activity 
and the extent to which the Fed- 
eral government touches the life 
of each citizen through design. 
The projects range from bridges 
and transportation facilities to a 
national memorial and a space 
exploration program. 

As the largest builder, printer 
and user of design services — 
more than 40 billion dollars an- 
nually — the Federal government 
is in a position to significantly 
improve U.S. design standards. 
Strong competition from well de- 
signed foreign products requires 
that the Federal government work 
closely with the private sector to 
upgrade the quality of American 
design. There was a time when 
"made in the U.S." stood for excel- 
lence and quality. Design helped 
give the U.S. its competitive edge. 
We urge the President to take the 
lead in encouraging quality in de- 
sign as a means to regain Amer- 
ica's competitive position. 

The jury applauds the National 
Endowment for the Arts for its 
pursuit of design excellence and 
urges that the Federal Design Im- 
provement Program be broadened 
and intensified. 



Frank Stanton 

Chairman 

Presidential Design Awards Jury 



988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



NEW 

SUNSHINE 
SKYWAY 
BRIDGE 



Tampa-St. Petersburg, 
Florida 




The New Sunshine Skyway Bridge 
across Tampa Bay is an engineering 
landmark. To either side of the main 
shipping channel two powerful 
masts rise 431 feet above the water. 
From each mast, 42 cables fan out to 
support the middle of the 9 5- foot- 
wide roadbed rather than the more 
traditional outer edges of the road- 
bed. The result is a thin silhouette 
that seems to float in mid-air, an 
effect made even more dramatic by 
a 1,200-foot central span. 

Jury Citation 

"The New Sunshine Skyway 
Bridge is a superb technical 
achievement and a work of art. 
The concrete bridge was con- 
structed utilizing both conven- 
tional and precast segmental 
construction. 



"When a freighter struck the 
original Skyway Bridge and 
caused a section of the bridge to 
collapse into Tampa Bay the Fed- 
eral Highway Administration and 
the Florida Department of Trans- 
portation wanted the new bridge 
to be designed in a way that vir- 
tually eliminated any threat of 
ship collision. This was success- 
fully accomplished by construct- 
ing a 1,200-foot main span. Its 
vertical clearance is 175 feet, an 
increase of 25 feet over the pre- 
vious bridge; its horizontal clear- 
ance is 1,000 feet, an increase of 
200 feet. Its 8,860-foot center 
portion consists of poured precast 
superstructure segments weigh- 
ing up to 220 tons — the largest 
ever precast for a bridge. The ris- 
ing and falling curve of the 
bridge, needed so ships can pass 
each other easily, greatly en- 
hances the aesthetic impact of 
this spectacular engineering 
work." 

Credits 

• U.S. Department of 
Transportation 

• Federal Highway 
Administration 

• Florida Department of 
Transportation 

• Figg and Muller Engineers, Inc. 
Tallahassee, FL 



988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



BOXLEY 
VALLEY 
LAND USE 
PLAN 



Buffalo National River, 
Arkansas 



Preserving a beautiful landscape of 
hills, forests and fields, and main- 
taining an historically important 
community of small working farms 
is the goal of the Boxley Valley Land 
Use Plan. In 1985, the National 
Park Service and local landowners 
formed a partnership to create a 
"scenic cultural landscape" along the 
shores of the Buffalo National River 
in north central Arkansas. 




in Arkansas and propose a man- 
agement plan that will preserve 
this significant rural agricultural 
zone. The plan acknowledges the 
complicated land ownership pat- 
tern that exists, and adapts the 
National Park Service planning 
process to the special conditions 
found there. 

"This plan will encourage the 
continuation of traditional agri- 
culture with sound conservation 
practices and farmhouse rehabili- 
tation. At the same time, it will 
protect the riverbanks and water 
quality in the Buffalo National 
River. The National Park Service 
deserves commendation for its 
flexibility in adapting its pro- 
cedures to special circumstances, 
and for its sensitivity to local 
concerns. It has demonstrated 
new ways to preserve significant 
cultural landscapes for future 
generations." 



Jury Citation 

"The Boxley Valley Report and 
Plan describe and analyze the 
physical characteristics of the 
landscape and land-use patterns 
along the Buffalo National River 



Credits 

• U.S. Department of the Interior 

• National Park Service 
Denver Service Center 

• Buffalo National River 



1988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



SOUTHWEST 

CORRIDOR 

PROJECT 



Boston, Massachusetts 




Under the sponsorship of the Urban 
Mass Transportation Administra- 
tion, Boston's Southwest Corridor 
Project has evolved into a model of 
transportation design and planning. 
The Ruggles Street station is part of 
a 13-year, $747 '-million effort that 
culminated in a 4.7 mile, eight-sta- 
tion transit line distinguished by 
community involvement in the plan- 
ning process, fine architecture and 
landscaping, and a general vitality 
and beauty that contributes to the 
metropolis of Boston. 

Jury Citation 

"The Southwest Corridor Project 
in Boston, Massachusetts, is an 
outstanding example of civic de- 
sign and transportation planning. 
Repairing the damage of an ear- 



lier highway plan, it has not only 
produced improved transporta- 
tion services, but also has con- 
tributed well-designed public 
buildings and a linear park with 
a lasting and positive effect on 
the form of the city. Surrounding 
neighborhoods benefit from en- 
hanced services, new recreational 
amenities, and the beauty of high 
quality public works. 

"The planning process is one 
of the most intensive public 
participation projects in the his- 
tory of Massachusetts. In addition 
to continuous public involvement 
with design and planning issues, 
the project included a high school 
career training program and pub- 
lication of a popular newspaper. 
In its social vision, as well as its 
design and engineering require- 
ments, the Southwest Corridor 
Project is a model for contem- 
porary urban design." 

Credits 

• U.S. Department of 
Transportation 

• Urban Mass Transportation 
Administration 

• Massachusetts Bay 
Transportation Authority 

• Stull & Lee, Inc., Architects 
and Planners, Boston, MA 



1988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



NATIONAL 
GALLERY OF ART 
GRAPHICS & 
EXHIBITIONS 



Washington, D.C. 




For the National Gallery of Art in 
Washington, D.C, quality design is a 
standard. This is evident in its prece- 
dent-setting exhibitions, especially 
the 1986 "The Treasure Houses of 
Britain: Five Hundred Years of Pri- 
vate Patronage and Art Collecting" 
show, in its graphics that beacon 
and inform visitors, and in its su- 
perb catalogues and publications. 

Jury Citation 

"The National Gallery of Art sub- 
mitted to the jury its exhibition 
graphics, as well as the exhibi- 
tion, "The Treasure Houses of Bri- 
tain," and two books — American 
Furniture from the Kaufman Collec- 
tion and Piranesi: Early Architec- 
tural Fantasies. 

"The graphics for the art ex- 
hibitions are multi-faceted: 
banners, varied and inviting ex- 
hibition entrances, photomurals, 
and captions carefully silk- 
screened on the wall, with addi- 



tional information strategically 
placed to provide just the right 
amount of information. 

"The beautiful catalogues 
are, like the exhibition designs, 
diverse in their approach and ap- 
propriate for their subjects. They 
attest to the scholarship and 
professionalism of the entire 
program. 

"The methodology of the 
National Gallery of Art for com- 
municating information through 
its graphics and exhibitions is 
flawless. By honoring it with a 
Presidential Award for Design Ex- 
cellence, the jury commends the 
gallery for maintaining consis- 
tently high standards of design 
throughout its programs and 
lauds its pursuit of innovative and 
dynamic solutions to its exhibi- 
tion challenges." 

Credits 

• National Gallery of Art 



988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



EAST 

HUNTINGTON 

BRIDGE 



Between Huntington, 
West Virginia and 
Proctorville, Ohio 



The Federal Highway Administra- 
tion's East Huntington Bridge over 
the Ohio River is a transportation 
sculpture. Its two longest spans — 
900 feet and 608 feet — are supported 
by pairs of cables that fan from a 
single "A "-shaped tower. The road- 
bed is captured between the sides of 
the 420-foot-tall mast. 




Jury Citation 

"The East Huntington Bridge is 
an achievement of technical, 
economical and aesthetic signifi- 
cance. Among the several tech- 
nical innovations used in its 
construction are a high-strength, 
10,000-lbs.-per-square-inch con- 



crete, the steel floor beams con- 
necting its main girders, and the 
prestressing of these girders. 

"The bridge is the first success- 
ful hybridization of structural 
steel and prestressed concrete in 
the main girders of a bridge. The 
bridge designers have shown 
great aesthetic sensitivity in the 
combination of the stayed spans 
with the adjacent spans, as well as 
in the shaping of its concrete 
components. 

"The late decision to use stayed 
spans with one tower and to com- 
bine two structural materials re- 
duced the cost of the bridge from 
$35 million to $25 million, show- 
ing how substantial economies 
can be achieved late into the ex- 
ecution of an important project 
without sacrificing engineering 
advantages or aesthetic results." 

Credits 

• U.S. Department of 
Transportation 

• Federal Highway 
Administration 

West Virginia Division 

• Arvid Grant and Associates, Inc. 
Olympia, WA 



988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



PENNSYLVANIA 

AVENUE 

PLAN 



Washington, D.C. 



Freedom Plaza is one of the focal 
points in the Pennsylvania Avenue 
Plan. The plan is the result of 16 
years of effort by the Pennsylvania 
Avenue Development Corporation to 
rehabilitate and revitalize the 16 
blocks between the U.S. Capitol and 
the White House — the nation's sym- 
bolic Main Street. The corporation 's 
planning, design guidelines and 
land-acquisition policies have made 
the avenue a model of excellence in 
urban design. 

Jury Citation 

"Established by an act of Con- 
gress in 1972, the Pennsylvania 
Avenue Development Corporation 
developed a detailed plan to re- 
store the decaying avenue be- 
tween the U.S. Capitol and the 
White House. Implementation 




of the plan is scheduled to be 
completed by 1992, but the suc- 
cess of the plan as an outstanding 
example of urban redevelopment 
can be seen today in the well- 
designed and actively used public 
spaces and the major private in- 
vestment in adjacent real estate 
along the avenue. 

"America's "Main Street" has 
been restored through the imple- 
mentation of a plan with strong 
design guidelines. The result is a 
visually harmonious and eco- 
nomically viable area. This once- 
blighted avenue has been refur- 
bished with wide brick sidewalks, 
well-chosen new street lights, fur- 
nishings, and plantings to create a 
framework for a series of new 
public parks and private build- 
ings. Both the plan and its imple- 
mentation set a standard in 
design quality and public-private 
partnerships that should inspire 
cities across the country." 

Credits 

• Pennsylvania Avenue 
Development Corporation 

• Sasaki Associates, Inc., 
Watertown, MA 

• Grenald Associates, Ltd., 
Narberth, PA 

• Tippetts-Abbett-McCarthy- 
Stratton, Washington, DC 

• Herbert S. Levinson, 
New Haven, CT 



988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



DELAWARE 
AQUEDUCT 
RENOVATION 



Between Lackawaxen, 
Pennsylvania and 
Minisink Ford, New York 



Constructed between 1847 and 1848, 
the Delaware Aqueduct is the earliest 
surviving work of John A. Roebling, 
designer of the Brooklyn Bridge. The 
National Park Service renovation has 
accommodated the pragmatic need to 
carry vehicular and pedestrian traffic 
while maintaining the historic integ- 
rity of the structure. 




Jury Citation 

"In 1979 a Federal Highway Ad- 
ministration inspection deter- 
mined the bridge to be in unsafe 
condition and ordered it closed. 
The closing isolated neighbors 
and the town of Lackawaxen 
from the regional highway 
network. 

"Engineers faced a number of 
challenges in designing a new su- 
perstructure system to carry the 
weight of vehicular traffic. Timber 



had to be ordered a year in ad- 
vance because of the unusual di- 
mensions and needed treatment. 
The restoration of the cable was 
an elaborate procedure done by 
hand. The original piers and ice 
breakers were reconstructed. The 
entire timber bridge deck was 
removed and replaced with a 
wooden truss system based on 
Roebhng's original design. 

"The project involved the pub- 
lic, a series of meetings with local 
officials, and many meetings with 
members of the Department of 
Transportation, the Advisory 
Council on Historic Preservation, 
and the State Office of Historic 
Preservation. 

"Now capable of carrying rural 
traffic loads, the aqueduct has 
been restored for use in a manner 
that respects the beauty of this 
early American landmark." 

Credits 

• U.S. Department of the Interior 

• National Park Service 
Mid-Atlantic Region 

• Abba G. Lichtenstein & 
Associates, Fairlawn, NJ 

• Beyer Blinder Belle Architects 
and Planners, New York, NY 

• Ammann & Whitney, 
New York, NY 



1988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



INTERNATIONAL 
ULTRAVIOLET 
EXPLORER 
SPACECRAFT & 
TELESCOPE 



The mission of the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration's 
International Ultraviolet Explorer 
Spacecraft and Telescope — a joint 
venture with the United Kingdom 
and the European Space Agency — is 
to obtain information on what stars, 
nebulae and galaxies are and how 
they develop. It does this with a tele- 
scope in an orbit around the earth's 
equator at an altitude of at least 
22,000 miles and at a speed match- 
ing the earth's rotation. This orbit 
maintains the telescope in a constant 
relation to points on the earth. 




Jury Citation 

"This Presidential Award for De- 
sign Excellence recognizes the 
importance and complexity of the 
international effort aimed at de- 
veloping the most important tool 
yet devised for the exploration of 
stars, nebulae, and galaxies. This 
project utilizes the technical 
know-how and scientific capa- 
bility of numerous countries, and 
shows the achievements obtain- 
able by multi-national efforts 
once a unifying purpose is found 
that will benefit humanity and 
advance technical progress. The 
telescope has been operating for 
more than 10 years, collecting the 
characteristics of stars invisible to 
the eye." 

Credits 

• National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration 

• Goddard Space Flight Center 



988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



VIETNAM 

VETERANS 

MEMORIAL 



Washington, D.C. 



The Vietnam Veterans Memorial on 
the Mall commemorates, by name, 
the more than 58,000 Americans 
who died in Vietnam. A visit is really 
a journey. The litany is carved onto 
two black granite walls that form a 
broad "V" embracing a shallow bowl 
of grass. Within this contemplative 
world, polished surfaces reflect the 
surrounding environment: people, 
the sky and clouds, the sun, the 
Lincoln Memorial to one side, the 
Washington Monument on the other. 




Jury Citation 
"Erected in 1982, the Vietnam 
Veterans Memorial is the first 
national monument to join the 
sacred enclave on the Mall since 
the Jefferson Memorial was built 
39 years ago. The memorial is vis- 
ually quiet, nonaggressive and 
overwhelming. This one superb 
design has changed the way war 
monuments — and monuments as 
a whole — are perceived: as the 
creation of an integral space 
rather than an object. The memo- 
rial as a space for commemora- 
tion has made the commemorator 
a part of the monument itself." 

Credits 

• U.S. Department of the Interior 

• National Park Service 

• Vietnam Veterans Memorial 
Fund 

• Maya Ying Lin, New York, NY 

• Cooper-Lecky Architects, EG, 
Washington, DC 



988 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



O'HARE 

TRANSIT 

LINE 



Chicago, Illinois 




The Urban Mass Transportation Ad- 
ministration provided major funding 
for the O'Hare extension to Chicago's 
rapid transit system. It was a mas- 
sive project, a 7.6-mile addition that 
continued an existing inner-city line 
to the O'Hare International Airport. 
Built in the median of the Kennedy 
Expressway, it boasts four new 
stations including this captivating 
airport terminal. The terminal im- 
presses users with its long people- 
movers, grand train hall, and backlit 
serpentine glass-block walls. 



Jury Citation 

"The O'Hare Transit Line reflects 
a high standard of design for pub- 
lic transportation. This superb fa- 
cility shows how well the public 
can be served when skillful and 
imaginative design is joined with 
enlightened transportation plan- 
ning. Its clear comprehensibility 
as a system and its skillfully 
handled stations encourage use. 
The terminal at O'Hare, with its 
undulating, luminous glass-block 
walls, is especially commendable 
for its lively and imaginative de- 
sign. This room is an all-too-rare 
achievement: a subway station 
that is at the same time a worthy 
gateway to the great city of Chi- 
cago that it serves." 

Credits 

• U.S. Department of 
Transportation 

• Urban Mass Transportation 
Administration Region V 

• City of Chicago 
Department of Public Works 

• Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 
Chicago, IL 

• Metz, Train, Youngren, 
Chicago, IL 

• Murphy/Jahn, Chicago, IL 

• Perkins & Will, Chicago, IL 




1988 Federal Design Achievement Awards Jury 

LtoR Standing: Fidel Lopez • Max Bond • Bruce Burdick • Ervin 
Zube • William Stump /• John Bullard • Donlyn Lyndon • Nicholas 
Chaparos • Tom Peyton • Myron Goldsmith • David Dibner • 
Katherine McCoy • Samina Quraeshi 

LtoR Seated: (Back Row) David De Long • Stanley Abercrombie • 
Donald Lynn • William Murtagh • H.C. Yu • (Middle Row) Henry 
N. Cobb • Sarah Tomerlin Lee • Diana Balmori • Linda Jewell • 
(Front Row) Joan Goody • Mario Salvadori • Leila Vignelli 



Recipients of the 1988 Federal Design 
Achievement Awards 

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 

EPA Graphic Standards System, Washington, DC 

FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION 

Examination Announcement Brochure, McLean, VA 

GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE 

GAO Visual Communications Standards, Washington, DC 

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 

Federal Building/U.S. Court of Appeals, Pasadena, CA 
Restoration of the 1879 Office of the Secretary of the 
Navy, Washington, DC 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

Air Service in World War I Book Series, Washington, DC 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE 
ADMINISTRATION 

International Ultraviolet Explorer Spacecraft and 
Telescope, Greenbelt, MD* 

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS 
Building by Design, Illinois Arts Council, Chicago, IL 
Competitive Edge Program, The University of Michigan, 

Ann Arbor, MI 
Massachusetts Design Program, Massachusetts Council 

on the Arts and Humanities, Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts 

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART»> 

Exhibition Graphics, Washington, DC 
Kaufman Furniture Collection Catalogue, 

Washington, DC 
Piranesi Etchings Catalogue, Washington, DC 
The Treasure Houses of Britain Exhibition, 

Washington, DC 

OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

Council of Federal Interior Designers, Washington, DC 

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT 
CORPORATION 

Pennsylvania Avenue Plan, Washington, DC* 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 
Cooper-Hewitt Museum 

Wine in Celebration Book, New York, NY 



National Portrait Gallery 
Gaston Lachaise Exhibition, Washington, DC 
John Frazee Exhibition, Washington, DC 
Permanent Collection Reinstallation, 
Washington, DC 

U.S. AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
Botswana Technology Center, Gaborone, Republic 
of Botswana 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
Forest Service 

Mount St. Helens Visitor Center, Castle Rock, WA 

Visual Prioritization Process, Tucson, AZ 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY 

Army Trainer Magazine, Fort Eustis, VA 
Patch Barracks Security, Stuttgart, West Germany 
Corps of Engineers 
Bowling Facility, Karlsruhe, West Germany 
Eagles Roost Stabilization, Missouri River, SD 
Red River Steam Plant, Texarkana, TX 
Sign Standards Manual, Washington, DC 
Willow Creek Dam, Heppner, OR 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

"What Works" Brochure, Washington, DC 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN 
DEVELOPMENT 

Charleston Waterfront Garages, Charleston, SC 
Fifth Street Renovation, Santa Monica, CA 
Housing for the Elderly, Eastern Shore, MD 
Nashville Union Station, Nashville, TN 
St. Louis Union Station, St. Louis, MO 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
Bureau of Mines 

Lake Lynn Laboratory, Fairchance, PA 

Mine Roof Simulator, Pittsburgh, PA 
Geological Survey 

Geological Survey Graphic Works, Reston, VA 

Maps and Minds Exhibition, Reston, VA 
Minerals Management Service 

Graphic Design Standards, Vienna, VA 
National Park Service 

Bear Valley Visitor Center, Point Reyes, CA 

Boxley Valley Land Use Plan, Buffalo National 
River, AR* 

Buffalo Point Campground, Buffalo National River, AR 



Delaware Aqueduct Renovation, Lackawaxen, PA* 
Glen Haven Exhibits, Sleeping Bear Dunes, MI 
Resource Protection Exhibits, Yosemite National Park, CA 
Statue of Liberty Centennial Campaign, Liberty 

Island, NY 
Statue of Liberty Centennial Exhibit, Liberty Island, NY 
Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, DC*+ 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 

Navy /Marine Reserve Training Center, Buckley 
ANG Base, CO 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

Office of Foreign Buildings Operations 

Federal Construction Council, Washington, DC* 

U.S. Embassy, Colombo, Sri Lanka 

U.S. Embassy, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 
Federal Highway Administration 

East Huntington Bridge, Over the Ohio River, WV* 

Enriched Information Signage, Chicago, IL 

Fort McHenry Tunnel, Baltimore, MD 

New Sunshine Skyway Bridge, Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL*> 
Urban Mass Transportation Administration 

Alewife Station and Garage, Cambridge, MA 

Arts on the Line, Cambridge and Somerville, MA 

O'Hare Transit Line, Chicago, IL* 

Southwest Corridor Project, Boston, MA* 

U.S. INFORMATION AGENCY 

USIA International Exhibits, Worldwide 
USIA International Paper Shows, Worldwide 

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE 

Postal Office, Kings Mountain, SC 

Postal Service Stamp Collection Book, Washington, DC 

U.S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT 

Treasury Building Restoration Program, Washington, DC 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 
Fort Custer National Cemetery, Fort Custer, MI 

♦Recipient of 1988 Presidential Award for Design Excellence 
* Supported by 13 other federal agencies 
-l-Supported in part by grants from the National Endowment 
for the Arts 

The Presidential Design Awards are administered by the 
Federal Design Improvement Program, a special project of 
the Design Arts Program of the National Endowment for 
the Arts